Assumed Names / Doing Business As

Make a name for yourself. Take the first step in building your assets by registering your business name

Legal Requirements for Restaurants

Assumed Name Rules Vary From State to State

There are plenty of good reasons to do business under an assumed name (aka DBA – “Doing Business As”). 

Whether you operate your business as a corporation, LLC, sole proprietor, or general partnership, you must follow every state’s specific DBA requirements for your business type. Some states even require registering in multiple locations, like the county or city where you’re doing business.

CT Helps You Navigate the Assumed Name Maze By

  • Conducting an assumed name availability check
  • Locating each and every agency where filing is required in each state, taking the footwork off your plate
  • Accurately preparing and filing your DBA documents according to each agency’s precise standards
  • Publishing the DBA and obtaining proof of publication, if required
  • Monitoring the entire process and quickly delivering your DBA certificate upon approval

 

Assumed Name Managed Service

An end-to-end solution for managing assumed name renewals, from tracking to application payments.

Talk to a Specialist

Have a specific question about a product? A CT Specialist will follow up with a custom quote along with a comprehensive assessment of your needs.

Doing Business As (DBA) FAQs

What is a publication requirement?

In some states, you’ll need to publish notice in a specific type of newspaper for a certain period of time and provide proof of publication before your DBA certificate is issued. Our experts are familiar with publication requirements throughout the country and can handle every detail on your behalf.

Can someone else use my DBA name?

In most states, a DBA name isn’t protected from use by another business—unlike your legal name. DBA registration is meant to inform the public, not protect the business owner. To protect a business name that is not your legal name, you should consider registering a trademark.